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MoveOn.Org in fundraising blitz for Democrat Warren

Sep 30, 2011, 2:22 p.m.
Elizabeth Warren speaks with voters as she campaigns after announcing her candidacy for the U.S. Senate in Framingham, Massachusetts, September 14, 2011. REUTERS/Adam Hunger

BOSTON (Reuters) - The progressive group MoveOn.Org said on Friday it had raised $300,000 in less than 24 hours to support consumer advocate Elizabeth Warren's bid for the U.S. Senate from Massachusetts.

Separately, Warren's Facebook page said her campaign had surpassed 15,000 individual contributions just before the end of the quarter.

The results showed Warren, a Harvard Law School professor and former Obama administration official, could assemble significant resources to go up against Republican Scott Brown, who has about $10 million in campaign funds on hand.

MoveOn lauded "an amazing outpouring of progressive support" for Warren, who set up the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau before leaving Washington in August.

The group sent out a fund-raising pitch to members on Thursday, just ahead of the third-quarter fund-raising deadline for political campaigns. MoveOn praised Warren for "holding big banks accountable," calling her "one of the great progressive voices on fixing the economy."

Democrats' efforts to defeat Brown, who in 2010 was elected in a huge upset to complete the term of the late Senator Edward Kennedy, is expected to be one of the most closely watched Congressional races in the country in 2012.

To take on Brown, Warren first needs to win the Democratic primary, which will be held in September 2012.

After jumping into the race a few weeks ago, she is the clear favorite. A Public Policy Polling survey taken Sept 16-18 showed Warren with 55 percent support among Massachusetts Democrats, far ahead of second-place Alan Khazei, founder of a youth development program, at 9 percent.

The first debate among Democratic candidates is scheduled for Tuesday at the University of Massachusetts in Lowell.

(Editing by Todd Eastham)

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